Lessons Learned In Business

Bulk Product Wholesale Sourcing – Wholesale Course Module 4 Part 5

Free Wholesale System - Finding Wholesale Leads for Amazon

This Post is part of the “FREE Wholesale Training Course”.  You can view the entire course listing and introduction to the course here.

You are here:

Module 4: Wholesale Research

You can click on each of the links above to go directly to the area of the module the best interests you.  That being said, let’s get right into the content!

Want to skip reading the massive wall of text?  After the entire course is released, I will make videos for each of the sections for easier consumption.  Make sure you are on our mailing list to be notified when it’s released!

Bulk Product Sourcing

If you’ve made it this far, you’ve realized the sourcing methods we’ve covered so far includes a lot of manual labor.  The bulk sourcing method removes a lot of the manual labor we’ve talked about in the previous sourcing methods.  Why didn’t we just do this one first?  Well, there are some building blocks you need to understand from the previous sourcing methods for the bulk sourcing method to work properly.  In addition, there are less monthly subscription tools you need to do the other sourcing methods.

What exactly is bulk product sourcing?

This is a method where you compile a mass amount of input data, use a tool that compares that data to Amazon data, and then filter the results that match your criteria.  It can cut down the time it takes to potentially find suppliers.

Who should use the bulk product sourcing strategy?

If you have any intention of selling already good selling products on Amazon, the bulk sourcing strategy is a very effective way to quickly find suppliers.  This method can be used in conjunction with the demand based sourcing method or the niche based sourcing method.  In fact – I would highly recommend it!

Some pros of using this sourcing method:

  • You can sift through a large amount of information extremely quickly.
  • With Amazon selling a lot of items themselves, it allows you to find the items Amazon doesn’t sell much quicker.
  • You can potentially find items that are out of stock on Amazon’s website that you wouldn’t otherwise be able to find.

Some cons of using this sourcing method:

  • You will likely miss some items / suppliers that have good potential.
  • You’ll never find suppliers that aren’t represented on Amazon (which you can do with the trade show method).
  • If you don’t like spreadsheets, or working with a lot of numbers, you will not enjoy this method at all.

Here are the basic steps of what we will do for bulk sourcing:

  1. Collect the data you want to analyze.
  2. Run the data through a tool such as Price Checker 2 or Tactical Arbitrage.
  3. If the data isn’t pre-filtered by the tool you use, set filters in the spreadsheet to match the criteria you are looking for.
  4. Individually look at each product to determine if it meets your criteria.
  5. Once done with a product research session, start researching contacts for each product.
  6. Log the contact as a lead in your CRM.

Before we get into Bulk Product Sourcing, there are some tools that are strongly recommended to make this method easier. We’ve previously discussed the different tools available, but I’ll narrow down to the tools that are specifically for helping you find leads:

There are two additional tools you will need specifically for this method.  You will need Storefront Stalker Pro, and one of Tactical Arbitrage or Price Checker 2.  In the instructions below, I will show uses for both Tactical Arbitrage or Price Checker 2.  You can choose one or the other, or both.  It may be wise to sign up for trials of both pieces of software and see which one you like better.

In addition, you will want a spreadsheet to log your supplier finds into.  You can create your own, or you can download the one below:

FREE SPREADSHEET: Download a FREE Wholesale ASIN Research Tracker that you can use to keep track of ASIN’s you need to do additional research with! Watch a free video on how to use the tracker here.

1. Collect the data you want to analyze.

The goal of the bulk sourcing method is to sift through as much Amazon data as possible, and find the gold nuggets.  Think of the bulk sourcing method as gold mining.  You could just go digging anywhere and hope to find gold.  However, there are some known places that have a higher concentration of gold.  These are the places you would likely want to spend your time because you would have a higher chance to find gold.  It would save you time and money if you go to those known places.

The first thing I like to do is determine which method of collecting data I want to use.  There are a few different methods, and they are all designed to help find the gold quicker.  In a perfect situation, you would like to grab literally every single ASIN from Amazon, and see which ones Amazon doesn’t sell.  This isn’t exactly feasible because Amazon doesn’t just hand out every single ASIN in their database.  You have to use a tool to find a list of the exact ASIN’s you want to run against Amazon’s database.  Most of the methods you can use require the use of Storefront Stalker Pro, although there is an option to use Tactical Arbitrage on its own.  Any way you look at it, I would strongly recommend having Storefront Stalker Pro for this exercise.  You are running blind without it.

Like I mentioned previously, we want to go to places that are more likely to have gold than not.  Here’s the places we are going to pan for our gold:

  • Other Amazon sellers
  • Drilling down deep into a category
  • Other websites.

Let’s start “panning”.

Other Amazon Sellers

Some people may think this is controversial, but searching other sellers’ storefronts is an extremely effective way to find wholesale leads. Other sellers have done research (just like you) to find wholesale suppliers that Amazon doesn’t carry.  Why not use that to your advantage?  Someone else is likely “stalking” your storefront right now for leads.  This is why it’s extremely important to have good value propositions, which make it difficult for other sellers to “steal” your good wholesale suppliers.

You aren’t exactly going to find gold every single time by looking at other Amazon seller storefronts.  There are a lot of different business models people are using for selling products on Amazon: Retail / Online Arbitrage, Liquidation, Private Label, and Direct Brand Owners are some of most common. In addition, some brand owners have contracts with resellers to only sell their product.  That being said, we do want to be a little selective on which storefronts we are “stalking”.  We want to try and eliminate Private Label brands and brand owners.  Depending on how much time you have, you may also want to stay away from smaller storefronts that have a hodge-podge of products.

We’ve previously went over how to determine if an item is a private label item.  You can use this same principle to find standard brand owners that are selling their own product.

Let’s start finding some storefronts to stalk, shall we?

If you’ve done one of the previous two methods manually, you likely already have been to some listings on Amazon that may have fit criteria you are looking for.  Those are great starting places to find other storefronts.  Another good place is to look at existing inventory you already have listed.  Finally, if none of that is appealing, just go to a category you are looking to sell products in, and find a random product.

We’ve used the LEGO 10697 as an example previously, so let’s start there.  I’m going to try and keep specific sellers’ names out of the examples, so we don’t damage all of their products :)

Once you are on the product page for a product, click on the “new” link in the “Other Sellers on Amazon” box:

lego new sellers example

This will list all of the sellers for the listing.  You want to choose sellers that have a decent amount of feedback.  This ensures they likely have a good number of products to research, and they are professional sellers.

start with sellers that have a decent amount of feedbackv2

Let’s check out the first one, which has 3,097 ratings. Do so by clicking on the underlined feedback rating.  This now takes you directly to the storefront of the seller in question.  Next, click on the products tab, to show all of the products for that seller.

storefront tab

Once you have the products tab open, you are mainly verifying they are not a private label seller and they sell a decent amount of products.  On this example, we can see there are 80 pages of product, and almost everyone on that page are major name brands.  This tells us they are not a private label seller.  The quality of this storefront may not be amazing because they carry so many different major brands (they look like they may be a liquidation or arbitrage seller), but it’s not going to deter me from grabbing the ASINs from this seller’s storefront.

products of storefront

It’s time to download all the ASINs from this storefront!  Right click on your Storefront Stalker Pro icon to bring up the drop down menu.  Then, left click on the “All ASIN From this Seller/Page” link.

storefront stalker open menu

The tool will scan through all the pages, and grab ASINs for every item in their inventory up to 100 pages.  Once it’s complete, the finished box comes up asking for the name you would like to use for the export file, and the format you are looking to use.  I would suggest using the “General” download, even if you are using Tactical Arbitrage as your tool of choice for scanning.  I like to use the store name I am stalking as the filename, along with today’s date.  Finally, click on the save button, and it will download a CSV file.  That’s the CSV file we will use in the next step!  You can either continue to grab more ASIN’s with the other methods we are referring to, or just immediately move on to Step 2.  Good job being a stalker!

storefront stalker ran

Drilling down deep into a category

The awesome thing about Storefront Stalker Pro is that it doesn’t just give you exports for Amazon storefronts.  It can also do the same thing for an Amazon search, or an Amazon category page.  For this example, we are going to start drilling down into a category, and download all the ASINs from that category.  It’s best to go relatively deep into a category, as Storefront Stalker Pro can only grab 400 pages.  400 pages equates to 9,600 ASIN’s.  Since we’ve been using LEGO as an example, let’s work on drilling down into that category.

Use the “Departments” link on Amazon to select the category you want.  As you start to drill down into the category, you’ll start to see products.  For this example, I went to Toys & Games, then Building Toys, and then Building Sets.  Scrolling down, you can see this category has over 29,000 results:

29k results

This is significantly more than the 9,600 Storefront Stalker Pro can pull.  We can either continue to drill down into the category, or we can just run Storefront Stalker Pro now, knowing we won’t get all the results.  I’m going to choose to drill down a little deeper.  We can use the filters on the side of the website to narrow the results a little more.  If you can’t go any deeper into a category, it’s time to use some of the other filters.  The one I like to use is price. If I want to only sell items that are at least $25, I can use that as a narrowing filter.   If I know my working capital is limited, and I wouldn’t feel comfortable buying items that retail for $150 or more, I can use that as a narrowing filter as well.  Let’s do that, and see what happens.  Type in 25 for the minimum, and 150 for the maximum in the price filter, and then click go.

set price filter

After running that filter, it narrowed down the results by more than half.  It’s now slightly above 13,000.

only 13k results now

This is still above the 9,600 Storefront Stalker Pro limit.  I could continue to filter items out by using some of the other filters. Or, I could just keep changing the pricing filter to a smaller range to get below 9,600.  In this case, I’m going to try the Gender filter, which gives me two options – Boys and Girls.  If I click on the Boys option, it narrows it down to 8,089.  If I click on the Girls option, it narrows it down to 5,318.  It looks like there may be a little bit of overlap – but that’s OK.  I could now run Storefront Stalker Pro on the Boys option first, and then run it again on the Girls option.  Doing both should give me all of the 13,026 results we saw from the initial pricing filter.

lego boys filter

Using the instructions from above, I’m going to run Storefront Stalker Pro on both of those filters.  I’ll name the Boys one “building toys-building sets-boys-25-150 081117” (description of the scan I’m running plus today’s date), and the Girls one “building toys-building sets-girls-25-150 081117”. Those are the CSV files we will use in the next step!  You can either continue to grab more ASIN’s with the final method below, or just immediately move on to Step 2.

Other websites

If you really want to drill down into a niche, you can use other websites to grab the information you need – as long as you have the amazing tool Tactical ArbitrageTactical Arbitrage is a tool that will go on other websites (there are hundreds of them available!), grab the product information, and then check it against Amazon’s database.  We can use this tool to our advantage if there is a specific niche website that carries products we are looking for.

What we will be doing with this method is choosing a store to grab information from, and then setting filters to find products that meet the criteria we are looking for.  As we’ve been doing in previous modules, we are going to use some generic criteria (which will likely be different than your actual criteria):

  • Amazon doesn’t sell the items
  • The item sells at least 15 times per month.
  • Pricing is close to MSRP.  I’m OK with it being a little less, but not drastically less.
  • Selling price on Amazon is at least $15.00
  • I’m OK with items that are NOT on Amazon, as long as they are not private label.

Now that we have an idea of what our criteria is, let’s fire up Tactical Arbitrage.  If you’ve used this tool for Online Arbitrage before (which is what this tool was originally created for), you usually would use it to find items you can buy for cheap, and resell on Amazon.  This usually means the products are much cheaper on the retailer website than on Amazon.

For this method, we are perfectly OK with items not showing as profitable if we bought them from the retailer’s website.  Remember, we aren’t buying them from the retailer – we are using their pricing to see if they are in line with pricing on Amazon.  This way, when we reach out to the supplier, there is a likely chance we will be able to purchase the items at a price that meets your buying requirements.

We need to choose a website to start with.  We used Halloween as an example in the previous section, so let’s choose a website that carries Halloween items – PartyCity.com.  In Tactical Arbitrage, go to the product search tab on the left.  Next, where is says “Website” choose partycity.com.

We also need to choose a specific category on partycity.com that we want to search through.  The initial section I’m going to check is Costume Accessories > All Accessories > Costume Wigs > Girls, Boys Wigs.  You can go to the website and choose any category you want – but this is the one we are going to use for this example.  The URL for this is http://www.partycity.com/category/costume+accessories/all+accessories/wigs/girls+boys.do, which are will copy and paste into the “category” section on Tactical Arbitrage.

tactical arbitrage party city

party city call outs

Now that we’ve figured out which section we are going to scan, we need to input filters so Tactical Arbitrage can show me the items we are looking for.   When preparing these filters, we need to keep the criteria above in mind.  Tactical Arbitrage is extremely granular, so you can be very specific in the types of items we are looking to find.  For our criteria, we are going to set the following filters:

  • Remove if Amazon is also a Seller and Now In Stock (Set to ON)
  • Remove Products with an Amazon price of less than (Set to $15.00)
  • Only keep data if Gross ROI is at least: (Set to -40%)
  • Also show No Match Found Results (Set to ON)

You may be wondering “why would I want to find NEGATIVE ROI items?”  Remember, the goal here is to find items that have pricing on retail sites that is similar to Amazon, or Amazon is higher priced than the retail sites.  Setting the Gross ROI filter to NEGATIVE 40% gives us all the items that are definitely above the price on the retail site, and it will also give us items that are close in price.  We’ll be buying these items at wholesale pricing, so we are perfectly happy if the pricing is the same on the retail website and Amazon.

As of right now, Tactical Arbitrage doesn’t have the ability to filter by number of estimated sales, which is why we haven’t set a filter for this criteria: “The item sells at least 15 times per month”.   They are currently working on this feature, so at some point in the future you’ll be able to filter by estimated sales.  For now, we don’t set any filters for this, and we manually sort the items out later once we are researching the results.  If you know sales ranks extremely well for a category, you could set a sales rank filter to estimate where that 15 per month cutoff is.

Assuming these are the filters you are going to use on a regular basis, it’s wise to save them, so you don’t have to enter them in every time.  In the “Save current filter setup as:” box, type in a name for the filters.  Something as simple as “wholesale scans” can work, or you can get really detailed and use something like “wholesale $15 price, no AZN, -40 ROI, Show no match”.  This reminds us we are using them for wholesale scans, and what settings we are using. If you decide to do different filters for various reasons, this way be wise to use.  Click the save button to save the filter.

Now that we’ve set the filters for our scan, we can start the scan!  Click on the Submit button to get it started.

tactical arbitrage filters

Once the scan is complete, you’ll want to set some additional filters on the data.   We do this in Step 3 below.

Once you’ve learned how to run a scan like this in Tactical Arbitrage, you will want to do scans even quicker.  Tactical Arbitrage has the ability to do bulk scans, where you can tell the tool to run more than one category at once.  Here’s how you do it:

Create a spreadsheet in Excel or Google Sheets with three headers: category, start page, and last page.  Next, go to the website you are wanting to pull information from.  Copy and paste every category URL you want Tactical Arbitrage to run into the spreadsheet.  You can do up to 400.  You can leave the columns start page and last page empty, as they are optional.  When you are done, the spreadsheet would look something like this:

tactical arbitrage bulk

In this example, I went through every sub category under wigs and added the links to this bulk list.  Now, save this file as a CSV file.  Name it how you like – I normally use the store name, category and date like “party city all wigs 081317”.  In case I want to run the scan on a later date, this naming convention makes it easy to find.

In Tactical Arbitrage, turn on the “Import Bulk Category List” button.  Next, click on the “upload new file” button. A new window will show, which gives you instructions of how to create the bulk like we just created.  Click on “choose file” and select the CSV file we just created.  Scroll down to the bottom and click on upload.  Now, a new box pops up to verify the columns match up properly.  Assuming you named the columns properly as above, it should match properly. Click on the upload button.  Now, the upload should show up on the Tactical Arbitrage product search page.  Now, select the correct store, and set the filters as shown above.  Tactical Arbitrage will go through all of the categories in succession, instead of just one category at a time.

tactical arbitrage bulk upload search

When the scans are finished, move to Step 3 below!

2. Run the data through a tool such as Price Checker 2 or Tactical Arbitrage.

If you’ve collected your data through Storefront Stalker Pro, you need to run the file you’ve downloaded through a tool to check it against Amazon’s database.  You can use Tactical Arbitrage or Price Checker 2 for this purpose.  I’ll show how to use both below.

Tactical Arbitrage

The method we will use for Tactical Arbitrage is very similar to the one we went through above.  Let’s get at it!

The file we downloaded from Storefront Stalker Pro doesn’t give us the exact information we need to run a scan in Tactical Arbitrage.  When doing a wholesale scan, Tactical Arbitrage requires us to have a price for each item in the CSV file we are uploading, otherwise it will skip the item.  But, we don’t have a wholesale price for each item.  What should we do?  Simple enough – we open the Storefront Stalker Pro download in Excel or Google Sheets, and modify the Price column. I like to use 0.01 as the price.  Really, it doesn’t matter what you put there, as we can’t use pricing as a filter anyways.  You just need something there so Tactical Arbitrage will run the file.  Once you’ve made the change, save the file with CSV format.

tactical arbitrage wholesale price

Now that the file is ready to go, lets go to Tactical Arbitrage.  For this method, we will click on the “Wholesale Search” button on the left hand side.  Click on the “upload new file” button.  This will bring up a pop-up that shows you how to create a CSV file for upload.  After making the change above, your file should meet the requirements.  If not, use the instructions on that page to modify your spreadsheet to meet the requirements.  Click on the “choose file” button, and select your CSV file.  Next, click on “upload” to upload the CSV file.  Now, a new box pops up to verify the columns match up properly.  By default, it should match up the ASIN column and the Price column properly.  It will also try to match the Link column to the product image, which isn’t current.  Change the drop down to “not defined”.

tactical arbitrage wholesale csv upload

Click on the upload button.  Now, the upload should show up on the Tactical Arbitrage wholesale search page.

We will want to select the source of where the information is coming from. We can be as detailed as we want here – just remember that the more detailed we are every time you do a scan, the “select source” area will start getting cluttered.  I like to keep it simple.  In this case, I am running a storefront, so I’ll name the source “Amazon Storefront”.  Where it says “Create New”, put Amazon Storefront (or choose it from the Select Source drop down menu if we’ve already created it).

tactical arbitrage wholesale search

I need to input filters so Tactical Arbitrage can show me the items I’m looking for.   When preparing these filters, we need to keep the criteria above in mind.  Tactical Arbitrage is extremely granular, so you can be very specific in the types of items you are looking to find.  For our criteria, we are going to set the following filters:

  • Remove if Amazon is also a Seller and Now In Stock (Set to ON)
  • Remove Products with an Amazon price of less than (Set to $15.00)
  • Also show Amazon Out of Stock Results (Set to ON)

We can’t set any filters on price, since we don’t have any pricing to work with.  As of right now, Tactical Arbitrage doesn’t have the ability to filter by number of estimated sales, which is why we haven’t set a filter for this criteria: “The item sells at least 15 times per month”.   They are currently working on this feature, so at some point in the future you’ll be able to filter by estimated sales.  For now, we don’t set any filters for this, and we manually sort the items out later once we are researching the results.  If you know sales ranks extremely well for a category, you could set a sales rank filter to estimate where that 15 per month cutoff is at.

Assuming these are the filters we are going to use on a regular basis, it’s wise to save them, so we don’t have to enter them in every time.  In the “Save current filter setup as:” box, type in a name for the filters.  Something as simple as “wholesale scans” can work, or we can get really detailed and use something like “wholesale $15 price, no AZN, Show AZN OOS”.  This reminds us we are using them for wholesale scans, and what settings we are using. If you decide to do different filters for various scans, this way may be wise to use.  Click the save button to save the filter.

Now that we’ve set the filters for our scan, we can start the scan!  Click on the Submit button to get it started.

tactical arbitrage wholesale filters v2

Once the scan is complete, we will want to set some additional filters on the export.  Move on to Step 3 to do this.

Price Checker 2

Price Checker 2 is another way to run scans for product.  Price Checker 2 has significantly less pre-scan filters than Tactical Arbitrage.  Since we don’t have other store pricing with a Storefront Stalker Pro export, all we can really filter out are listings that Amazon is a seller on.  We can also filter by Best Seller Rank if we want to go by percentage.  In this example, we will only filter out the “Amazon is a Seller” listings.   To do so, we need to make sure we setup AWS with Price Checker 2 prior to doing the scan.  Here’s a video created by the owner of Price Checker 2 on how to setup AWS, to show how this feature works:

To set the setting which filters out all the “Amazon is a Seller” listings, go to Settings > Set Results Filters.  Checkmark where it says, “Amazon is a Seller (ignored if AWS not set up)”.

price checker 2 filter settings

Now that we have the filters set, it’s time to run our scan.  Go to the “run a file” tab.  Click on the “Select Product Input File” and select the Storefront Stalker Pro file we exported earlier. It should automatically detect the ASIN column on the import.  we can leave all the other settings as default.  Once complete, click on the “Start” button at the bottom of the page.

start price checker scan

Depending on how large the file is, it could take 5 minutes or less for a small file, and upwards of an hour for larger files.  Let the file complete the scan, and once it’s done, we can move on to Step 3!

3. If the data isn’t pre-filtered by the tool you use, set filters in the spreadsheet to match the criteria you are looking for.

We’ve run the scans with the tool of choice.  Both Tactical Arbitrage and Price Checker 2 have filters you can set before a scan starts.  However, there are some additional filters you will likely want to set prior to individually looking at products.  Let’s take a look at both:

Tactical Arbitrage

Depending on which scan we ran, our data will be in either the “View Data” area, or the “Wholesale Search > View Wholesale” area.

Currently, Tactical Arbitrage doesn’t have the ability to use filters on the finished data (although it’s coming).  Due to this limitation, I like exporting the data into an Excel spreadsheet instead of using the data directly inside Tactical Arbitrage.  On either the “View Data” or “View Wholesale” areas, there is a “download all” button.  Click on it to download all of the results we’ve scanned.  A box will pop up asking the format.  The format we want is a CSV file, so click on the “Download All as a CSV file” link.

tactical arbitrage export to excel

tactical arbitrage download csv

Once we’ve exported all the results, it’s wise to delete the results in Tactical Arbitrage, to ensure it’s empty the next time we do a scan. Click on the “delete all” button to delete all results in the list.

tactical arbitrage delete results

Open the results in Google Sheets, or Microsoft Excel.  We are going to use Microsoft Excel for this example.

Looking at the data in Excel from our export, there is a lot of it!  There are a couple filters that we can set to whittle down the information we are looking at. Tactical Arbitrage gives us the total number of sellers on each listing, and the current price the item is selling for.  If there are no filters on the spreadsheet when we opened it up we need to set filters on the first row that has the headers.

Based on the example criteria we’ve been using, we want to remove all items that have more than 10 sellers.

set number of sellers filterprice checker no of sellers filter 2

Now we can remove all items that have a price under $15.

excel price change

price checker lowest MFN price filter 2

By setting these filters, it now shows only 131 records out of the 489 originally in the spreadsheet.  This significantly cuts down the number of listings we would manually research.

Now that we’ve set the filters, we can move on to step 4.

Price Checker 2

Once a scan is complete, it will save all the results to an Excel spreadsheet and you can open this in Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel.  We are going to use Microsoft Excel for this example.

Looking at the data in Excel from our latest scan, there is a lot of it!  There are a couple filters that we can set to whittle down the information we are looking at.  Price Checker 2 gives us a sales estimation column, and it also gives us the total number of sellers on each listing.

Based on the example criteria we’ve been using, we want to remove all items that don’t sell at least 15 items per month.

price checker excel filter share of sales

price checker share of sales filter 1

We also want to remove all items that have more than 10 sellers.

price checker no of sellers filter 1

price checker no of sellers filter 2

Finally, we can also remove all items that are less than $15.  There are a few different columns we can use here: BuyBox Price New, Lowest FBA New Price, or Lowest MFN New Price.  I like to choose the column that has all the numbers filled in for all items.  In this example, that happens to be the “Lowest MFN New Price”.  The reason why this is the best one for this example is because there are multiple suppressed buy boxes for the items listed.  This causes the prices to show up blank on the spreadsheet.  Alternatively, we could also use the “Seller Proceeds” column for this purpose.  This would be the amount you would receive from Amazon if we sold the item at the current price.  We would need the wholesale price to be less than this number.  Based on some of the assumptions we’ve been running with, using $10 or less for Seller Proceeds would work here too.

price checker filtering price fields

Here’s how to set that filter:

price checker lowest MFN price filter 1

price checker lowest MFN price filter 2

By setting these filters, it now shows only 11 records out of the 716 originally in the spreadsheet.  This significantly cuts down the number of listings we would manually research.

Now that we’ve set the filters, we can move on to step 4.

4. Individually look at each product to determine if it meets your criteria.

We’ve run our tools, and have lots of data. It’s time to manually look at each item to see if it further meets the criteria we are looking for.  We’ll use the same method learned in the niche based sourcing section.  Since we already know Amazon doesn’t sell this item, and it’s met some of the other criteria we’ve referred to, we just want to see if the pricing for each brand is in line with MSRP.

The goal here is to use the original item we found as a lead into the brand itself.  Effectively, we use the item we found in bulk just like we would a trade show lead.  Moving forward, we will use the exact same process as we did in the niche based sourcing method.

Pulling up the first item in our spreadsheet, we can see the brand is “Vtech”, so we click on that brand name on the listing itself.  One thing I noticed prior to clicking on the brand name is that Vtech themselves sell this product.  This may be a sign that this is not a good brand to move forward with.  We will need to check some other listings to see if they are on most listings – there could be an opportunity when they are discontinuing some of their products.

vtech item

Going to the brand page, I noticed more flags that make me not want to move forward with this brand. Typically when you click on a brand name, you’ll see either a search page with results for the brand, or a “semi-brand” page.  A “semi-brand” page will have some sort of branding from the brand itself, but it will still show all items for the brand.  What we see with Vtech is a full-scale brand page.  There are social media links, a video describing the brand, and there’s no master listing of products.  They only have sub categories to flow customers through.  This likely means either Amazon created this page on their own due to the size of the brand, or the brand owners themselves paid Amazon to create the page.  These are all signals that tell me this brand is too large, and aren’t what we are looking for.  This would be a pass for me.

vtech brand page

Now that we’ve done some research on this brand, I want to log it to make sure I don’t waste my time on this brand moving forward.  If you’ve been doing Niche Based sourcing or Demand Based sourcing, you can use the same spreadsheet from either one.  Since I have ASINs to work with, I find it easier to use the “Wholesale ASIN Research Tracker” that was introduced in Demand Based sourcing.  We’re going to copy / paste the information from the data scans we did earlier into the tracker.

asin and bsr from price checker 2 export

asin and bsr into tracker

Since we just completed research on the first brand, we’re going to log the information into the tracker.  We’ll put into the notes that they have a brand page and the brand owner is a seller of that brand.

vtech logged into tracker

We’ll continue to do this for each item we found from the export. Once we find a potentially good lead, we will run the same process as taught in the niche based sourcing method (Run Market Intelligence to verify there are enough sales for the brand, and check to see if the pricing is in line with MSRP). Now it’s time to research the contacts for each product.

5. Once done with a product research session, start researching contacts for each product.

We’ll use the same process as outlined in the niche based sourcing section to log the contact information in the tracker.

6. Log the contact as a lead in your CRM.

Take all the leads from this spreadsheet, and enter them into your CRM.  If your CRM is a separate spreadsheet, copy / paste the info into the correct spreadsheet.  If your CRM has an import function, use it.  Here’s links to instructions for some of the common CRM’s to import your leads:

It’s time to start contacting your leads!

Once you have compiled leads, it’s time to start contacting the leads and landing wholesale accounts. Building relationships with suppliers is in module 5.

Need help with sourcing?  We can help with our Mentoring Program.

Continue on to Module 4 Part 6: Relationship Sourcing

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Chris Potter

Chris Potter is an internet entrepreneur that loves working on businesses and helping others with their businesses. He has operated businesses that have sold over $25 million in retail sales, bought and sold a blog design business, and started websites from scratch. Skyrocket your business by joining his Mentoring Program!

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